Costume Design- Historical and Beyond

 

Below are a collection of my favorite historical, science fiction and other costuming projects.

“Sands of Ikkera”- Red Gryphon Pictures- 2014 10441104_10202385121890694_3610491351486075526_n

In 2014, I had the privilege of designing and constructing the costumes for “Sands of Ikkera”, an independent short sci-fi/fantasty film produced by Red Gryphon Pictures. You can read more about the project and see the final film here. Below are production photos highlighting the lead characters and armored characters.

“Kaja” (Protagonist)

“Aatos” (Protagonist)

“Jaruk” (Antagonist)

“Marauders and City Guard”

Ballgowns

From watching Anna in “The King and I” swirl in her ballgowns, to volunteering as a Living History Docent in 5th grade, history, fancy dresses and costuming have been a deep love for many years.

I began to sew ballgowns in 2012, after dreaming of them and sketching them for most of my childhood. Since then, they remain some of my favorite projects to look back on and continue to dream towards making. . .

“Rose and Lace”

“Teal Gown”

“Periwinkle”

Adoria 2010- Costume Line

For the same fashion show in 2010 I designed two separate lines. While the first line (see the “fashion design” section of my site) was inspired by the subtlety feminine qualities, below is the costume line, inspired by the more whimsical side of seeing the world- past, present, future and beyond. . .

“Innocence”

“Diversity”

“Remembrance”

“Tranquility”

“Adventure”

Film-Inspired

“Sophie”- Howl’s Moving Castle

Photography, MUAH by: Elphontina Formaggio Photography
Models: Hannah Littier and Alex Hansen
Sophie Costume designed and constructed by: Hannah Littier

Mandalorian Armor- Custom Design, Inspired by StarWars

Historically Inspired

Beyond Ballgowns and fashion shows, my love of history has overflowed to many of my projects:

“Victorianesque Long Jacket”

“Garibaldi Blouse and 1850’s Day Dress”

Historical Accuracy Note: The Garibaldi blouse is shown here intentionally as a “Victorian mashup” rather than with a historically accurate skirt and hat. The day dress is being worn with no extra petticoats or hoop, which would typically be worn to make it period correct. Just in case any history buffs were wondering. . . 

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